How Turkey was lost

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Once the apotheosis of a pro-Western, dependable Muslim democracy, this week Turkey officially left the Western alliance and became a full member of the Iranian axis.

 

 

It isn’t that Ankara’s behavior changed fundamentally in recent days. There is nothing new in its massive hostility toward Israel and its effusive solicitousness toward the likes of Syria and Hamas. Since the Islamist AKP party first won control over the Turkish government in the 2002 elections, led by AKP chairman Recip Tayyip Erdogan, the Turks have incrementally and inexorably moved the formerly pro-Western Muslim democracy into the radical Islamist camp populated by the likes of Iran, Syria, Hizbullah, al-Qaida and Hamas.

 

 

What made Turkey’s behavior this week different from its behavior in recent months and years is that its attacks were concentrated, unequivocal and undeniable for everyone outside of Israel’s scandalously imbecilic and flagellant media.

 

 

Until this week, both Israel and the US were quick to make excuses for Ankara. When in 2003 the AKP-dominated Turkish parliament prohibited US forces from invading Iraq through Kurdistan, the US blamed itself. Rather than get angry at Turkey, the Bush administration argued that its senior officials had played the diplomatic game poorly.

 

 

In February 2006, when Erdogan became the first international figure to host Hamas leaders on an official state visit after the jihadist group won the Palestinian elections, Jerusalem sought to explain away his diplomatic aggression. Israeli leaders claimed that Erdogan’s red carpet treatment for mass murderers who seek the physical destruction of Israel was not due to any inherent hostility on the part of the AKP regime toward Israel. Rather, it was argued that Ankara simply supported democracy and that the AKP, as a formerly outlawed Islamist party, felt an affinity toward Hamas as a Muslim underdog.

 

 

Jerusalem made similar excuses for Ankara when during the 2006 war with Hizbullah Turkey turned a blind eye to Iranian weapons convoys to Lebanon that traversed Turkey; when Turkey sided with Hamas against Israel during Operation Cast Lead, and called among other things for Israel to be expelled from the UN; and when Erdogan caused a diplomatic incident this past January by castigating President Shimon Peres during a joint appearance at the Davos conference. So, too, Turkey’s open support for Iran’s nuclear weapons program and its galloping trade with Teheran and Damascus, as well as its embrace of al-Qaida financiers have elicited nothing more than grumbles from Israel and America.

 

 

Initially, this week Israel sought to continue its policy of making excuses for Turkish aggression against it. On Sunday, after Turkey disinvited the IAF from the Anatolian Eagle joint air exercise with Turkey and NATO, senior officials like Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon and opposition leader Tzipi Livni tried to make light of the incident, claiming that Turkey remains Israel’s strategic ally.

 

 

But Turkey wasted no time in making fools of them. On Monday, 11 Turkish government ministers descended on Syria to sign a pile of cooperation agreements with Iran’s Arab lackey. The Foreign Ministry didn’t even have a chance to write apologetic talking points explaining that brazen move before Syria announced it was entering a military alliance with Turkey and would be holding a joint military exercise with the Turkish military. Speechless in the wake of Turkey’s move to hold military maneuvers with its enemy just two days after it canceled joint training with Israel, Jerusalem could think of no mitigating explanation for the move.

 

 

Tuesday was characterized by escalating verbal assaults on the Jewish state. First Erdogan renewed his libelous allegations that Israel deliberately killed children in Gaza. Then he called on Turks to learn how to make money like Jews do.

 

 

Erdogan’s anti-Israel and anti-Semitic blows were followed on Tuesday evening by Turkey’s government-controlled TRT1 television network’s launch of a new prime-time series portraying IDF soldiers as baby- and little girl-killers who force Palestinian women to deliver stillborn babies at roadblocks and line up groups of Palestinians against walls to execute them by firing squad.

 

 

The TRT1 broadcast forced Israel’s hand. Late on Tuesday, the Foreign Ministry announced it was launching an official protest with the Turkish Embassy. Unfortunately, it was unclear who would be coming to the Foreign Ministry to receive the demarche, since Turkey hasn’t had an ambassador in Israel for three weeks.

 

 

TURKEY’S BREAK with the West; its decisive rupture with Israel and its opposition to the US in Iraq and Iran was predictable. Militant Islam of the AKP variety has been enjoying growing popularity and support throughout Turkey for many years. The endemic corruption of Turkey’s traditional secular leaders increased the Islamists’ popularity. Given this domestic Turkish reality, it is possible that Erdogan and his fellow Islamists’ rise to power was simply a matter of time.

 

 

But even if the AKP’s rise to power was eminently predictable, its ability to consolidate its control over just about every organ of governance in Turkey as well as what was once a thriving free press, and change completely Turkey’s strategic posture in just seven years was far from inevitable. For these accomplishments the AKP owes a debt of gratitude to both the Bush and Obama administrations, as well as to the EU.

 

 

The Bush administration ignored the warnings of secular Turkish leaders in the country’s media, military and diplomatic corps that Erdogan was a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Rather than pay attention to his past attempts to undermine Turkey’s secular, pro-Western character and treat him with a modicum of suspicion, after the AKP electoral victory in 2002 the Bush administration upheld the AKP and Erdogan as paragons of Islamist moderation and proof positive that the US and the West have no problem with political Islam. Erdogan’s softly peddled but remorselessly consolidated Islamism was embraced by senior American officials intent on reducing democracy to a synonym for elections rather than acknowledging that democracy is only meaningful as a system of laws and practices that engender liberal egalitarianism.

 

 

In a very real sense, the Bush administration’s willingness to be taken in by Erdogan paved the way for its decision in 2005 to pressure Israel to allow Hamas to participate in the Palestinian elections and to coerce Egypt into allowing the Muslim Brotherhood to participate in its parliamentary poll.

 

 

In Turkey itself, the administration’s enthusiastic embrace of the AKP meant that Erdogan encountered no Western opposition to his moves to end press freedom in Turkey; purge the Turkish military of its secular leaders and end its constitutional mandate to preserve Turkey’s secular character; intimidate and disenfranchise secular business leaders and diplomats; and stack the Turkish courts with Islamists. That is, in the name of its support for its water-downed definition of democracy, the US facilitated Erdogan’s subversion of all the Turkish institutions that enabled liberal norms to be maintained and kept Turkey in the Western alliance.

 

 

As for the Obama administration, since entering office in January it has abandoned US support for democracy activists throughout the world, in favor of a policy of pure appeasement of US adversaries at the expense of US allies. In keeping with this policy, President Barack Obama paid a preening visit to Ankara where he effectively endorsed the Islamization of Turkish foreign policy that has moved the NATO member into the arms of Teheran’s mullahs. Taken together, the actions of the Bush and Obama White Houses have demoralized Westernized Turks, who now believe that their country is doomed to descend into the depths of Islamist extremism. As many see it, if they wish to remain in Turkey, their only recourse is to join the Islamist camp and add their voices to the rising chorus of an
ti-Americanism and anti-Semitism sweeping the country.

 

 

Then there is the EU. For years Brussels has been stringing Turkey along, promising that if it enacts sufficient human rights reforms, the 80-million strong Muslim country will be permitted to join Europe. But far from inducing more liberal behavior on the part of Turkey, those supposedly enlightened reforms have paved the way for the Islamist ascendance in the country. By forcing Turkey to curb its military’s role as the guarantor of Turkish secularism, the EU took away the secularists’ last line of defense against the rising tide of the AKP. By forcing Turkey to treat its political prisoners humanely and cancel the death penalty, the EU eroded the secularists’ moral claim to leadership and weakened their ability to effectively combat both Kurdish and Islamist terror.

 

 

At the same time, by consistently refusing to permit Turkey to join the EU, despite Ankara’s moves to placate its political correctness, Brussels discredited still further Turkey’s secularists. When after all their self-defeating and self-abasing reforms, Europe still rejected them, the Turks needed to find a way to restore their wounded honor. The most natural means of doing so was for the Turks writ large to simply turn their backs on Europe and move toward their Muslim brethren.

 

 

FOR ITS part, as the lone Jewish state that belongs to no alliance, Israel had no ability to shape internal developments in Turkey. But still, Turkey’s decision to betray the West holds general lessons for Israel and for the free world as a whole. These lessons should be learned and applied moving forward not only to Turkey, but to a whole host of regimes and sub-national groups in the region and throughout the world.

 

 

In the first instance it is crucial for policy-makers to recognize that change is the only permanent feature of the human condition. A country’s presence in the Western camp today is no guarantee that it will remain there in the future. Whether a regime is democratic or authoritarian or somewhere in the middle, domestic conditions and trends play major roles in determining its strategic posture over time. This is just as true for Turkey as it is for the US, for Iran and for Sweden and Egypt.

 

 

The loss of Turkey shows that countries can and do change. The best way to influence that change is to remain true to one’s friends, even if those friends are imperfect. Only by strengthening those who share one’s country’s norms and interests – rather than its procedures and rhetoric – can governments exert constructive influence on internal changes in other states and societies.

 

 

Moreover, it is only by being willing to recognize what makes an ally an ally and an adversary an adversary that the West will adopt policies that leave it more secure in the long run. A military-controlled Turkish democracy that barred Islamists from political power was more desirable than a popularly elected AKP regime that has moved Turkey into the Iranian axis. So, too, a corrupt Western-dependent regime in Afghanistan is more desirable than a Taliban-al-Qaida terror state. Likewise an unstable, weakened mullocracy in Iran challenged by a well-funded, liberal opposition is preferable to a strong, stable mullocracy that has successfully repressed its internationally isolated liberal rivals.

 

 

Turkey is lost and we’d better make our peace with this devastating fact. But if we learn its lessons, we can craft policies that check the dangers that Turkey projects and prepare for the day when Turkey may decide that it wishes to return to the Western fold.

 

 

Originally published in The Jerusalem Post.

 

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17 Comments

  • Marcel 10/16/2009 at 20:24

    ‘the US facilitated Erdogan’s(Islam’s) subversion of all the Turkish institutions that enabled liberal norms to be maintained and kept Turkey in the Western alliance.’
    Secular government was good for Turkey and very good for Israel.
    Secular government has been really,really bad for lemming land,Israel.
    Now that true Islam has replaced it thats all changed except Israel’s seccular,leftist government refuses to return to it’s historic Jewish roots, still looking to the worthless and dying west for survival and seeing the mirage of peace by appeasing unappeasable Islam.
    Stubbornly,Israel still want to be just like the ‘other’ nations.It’s not meant to be and will never be as the UN keeps making so clear.
    Consistent failure is the only road Israel’s ssecular LOSERS knows to follow at this late hour.Failure to defeat Hizbollah,failure to defeat Hamas,failure to end the false peace agenda forced on it by the treacherous West as a sacrificial offering to the Islamic hordes who now control and intimidate the near dead West at will.
    Eventually weak,self loathing,godless, liberal,self destructive Judiasm will give way to a true faith based obedience to Hashem and a to hell with what the nations say or think attitude.Pleasing God will no longer be considered shameful to those who survive the suicidal peace process.
    What the Moslem Turks see is the decline and fall of the Pax Americana Empire.They’re not as loaded down with the stupidity and blindness that has terminally infect liberal,self destroying western society and know which way the wind is blowing.
    The Jewish prophet Ezekiel (38-39) wrote many millenium ago that Turkey would join the Russian,Islamic alliance against Israel.
    Israel’s alliance with Turkey was a short abberation.
    You had high hopes that Pax Americana would birth democracy in the midst of allahland.
    It was an impossibility from the start as freedom and Islam are moral opposites.
    Peace with Islam is impossible,one will have to disappear from the face of the earth.BTW Israel is here to stay.
    Those who trust God instead of believing the political fools knew this was coming long ago.
    All the plans of the godless fools are swept into the trash bin of history and the Holy One of Israel has the final word.
    Better get with His agenda and drop the dead end one Israel’s been following all these years.

    Reply
  • Pops 10/16/2009 at 21:35

    Another great article Captain Glick,
    Despite your precise analysis the world will learn nothing from this. The US and EU will continue blundering along on the wrong course.
    I’m afraid that this will all come down to a force of arms. I hope the French reports are correct that Israel will take out her enemies soon. You better hit them before they hit you.
    Stay safe,
    Pops

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  • Marc Handelsman, USA 10/17/2009 at 1:18

    Turkey is part of modern Islamic Totalitarianism which started in Iran and continues to spread. Unfortunately, there are no men of stature who will craft policies to check the Turks and Persians. Turkey will not return to the Western fold, nor will it be expelled from NATO. Now Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal is in danger of falling to the Taliban and Al-Qaida. If that happens, Islamic nuclear proliferation will have entered a new stage, and nuclear terrorism may become a reality. And Israel should not let the “turkeys” get it down.

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  • Arius 10/17/2009 at 2:17

    Treaties with Turkey are not worth much. After Armenia recently signed the accords to open their common border the Turkish government a day later said that the border will not open until the Nagorno-Karabakh issue is resolved with Azerbaijan. Armenia used its political capital and was burned for it.
    Marcel is right, peace with Islam is impossible. I would add that treaties with Muslims are worthless.

    Reply
  • vinny 10/17/2009 at 4:54

    I think that an article from WSJ titled “a decadent nobel” by henninger, is complimentary to your post.

    Reply
  • Perfected Democrat 10/17/2009 at 7:19

    Ataturk’s legacy is fading in Turkey, time and numbers taking their toll. It’s hard to believe that Turkey will ever recover from this reversion to its islamist roots, without some equivalent circumstances to those of the 1920’s. Like perhaps many, I often wondered if there was hope yet for this world if a modern Turkey could be allied with Israel. However, it appears to have been a chimera, not unlike the Shah’s Iran. Is there perhaps a wisp of hope with the Kurds, over a long period of time? Unfortunately it would be an alliance which would instantly dictate war with Turkey. There is still hope for America, even outnumbered there are a lot of very angry people who are not going to acquiesce easily in the current betrayal (of Honduras, America, Israel, as well as others) by the now far-left Democrats and their closet-moslem communist Obama. Googling to recharge my memory about the history of Turkey and Ataturk, I ran across the following tip of an iceberg of entries, any comment? BTW you and Pamela (Atlas)are the best, thanks for the thoughtful work! Link:
    http://www.iraq-war.ru/article/207310

    Reply
  • Marcel 10/17/2009 at 15:48

    I saw a youtube video last week with the podium placard message below Obama reading ‘Judgment to Lead’ and as I’ve been conditioned in dealing with communists and moslems who twist the truth,‘Lead to Judgment’ is what I saw.
    What so many well meaning lovers of this once great nation are in denial about is that once God has become your enemy ,it’s over.
    To whom much is given,much is required.
    We’ve squandered our wonderful inheritance and the handwriting on the Obama wall is ‘God’s wrath is upon this God rejecting,perverted,violent,sodomite land,there is no turning back.
    Israel went thru the same war with God in Jeremiah’s day and they lost.
    We think arrogantly that we are different,special.
    Yes we are ,we will get special wrath from God on those He blessed so abundantly and turned away spitefully from.
    A nation at the head of the table working overtime to destroy Israel,to deliver it to God’s enemies has no hope or future.
    It’s DOA, no matter how hard you try to save the already dead carcass.
    Get your house in order and learn the fear of God if you haven’t already because He is the only safety in this coming storm which He is sending on the world wide wicked.

    Reply
  • Ron Grandinetti 10/17/2009 at 17:38

    Caroline, it boils down to you never know who your friends are but you better know your enemies.
    We have to recognize radical Islam is on the rise and it will get worst before it gets better.
    The reason Israel has to become more and more independent and stronger than ever.
    The Israelis have to take control of all of Israel, especially Jerusalem the capital and I mean complete control. If that means moving radical Palestinians out, yes. Tighter security measures have to be established.
    No more playing softball with Hamas. If there any rockets are sent into Israel they have to be met with devastation and air strikes against their headquarters.
    The Israeli ADF has to take out any and all military installations established by Hezbollah along the southern part of Lebanon. This is viable threat against Israel.
    The Israeli government has to let this U.S. administration know that Israel will do what ever it takes to protect her people and sovereignty regardless what they think or wish.
    Israel should look to India to partner against their enemies.
    It’s time for the Jewish people to abandon their secular ideas and cling to their faith.
    Does this seem harsh, no in reality; it’s all about self preservation.

    Reply
  • DaveP 10/18/2009 at 1:29

    Perfected Democrat wrote : Is there perhaps a wisp of hope with the Kurds..
    Not really. Kurds are pro-American for the simple reason that the USA is the only thing that prevents Kurdistan from being invaded by its neighbours. The same argument applies to Albanians, Kosovans, and Bosnians. They are fervently pro-American because it is a matter of national survival for them. If the threat recedes, they will, like Kuwait, revert to their traditional anti-Kuffar state.

    Reply
  • Bill K. 10/18/2009 at 8:54

    Your article is a cri de coeur that the United States and Israel cease the destructive range of the moment pragmatism that has characterized their foreign policies and start engaging in a principled, long range outlook with their friends and enemies.
    Contrary to your claim that “change is the only permanent feature of the human condition” there are eternal principals that should guide our relations with other countries:
    1. Appeasement never works. Not ever. This is one of the most unambiguous lessons of history. Appeasement is a short range tactic that invariably backfires. The looming conflict you avoided today rebounds on you many times worse tomorrow. The Islamist scourge that Carter could not bring himself to end, with relative ease, in 1979 has gotten worse with each successive president, who followed Carter’s lead, until today when we are on the brink of a major war with nuclear potential.
    2. As you have noted, recognize the enemy for what he is. Every American president from Jimmy Carter to Obama has avoided this vital necessity with regards to Islamic Totalitarianism. Political correctness, insularity, naiveté, coupled with the simple-minded notion that any religion is beneficial and thus its followers must be fundamentally incapable of evil, have blinded all these presidents to the threat of Islamism. Similarly, and with even less excuse, the United States has not recognized Israel as the major ally that it is. Israel is perhaps the most beneficial reflection of American influence in the world. Even the mullahs are more cognizant of this relationship than most American presidents. Thus the backhanded compliment of calling us the “Big Satan” and the “Little Satan”.
    3. Foreign policy must promote the rational interests of our countries. Foremost among these interests are protection of our citizens at home and abroad. If our citizens are systematically attacked abroad we may have to take action to rectify these assaults. Somalia and Gaza come to mind. The repeated attacks cannot be tolerated and must be terminated in any way possible. There is no such thing as “disproportionate” force in war and there is no need to consult with some fictitious “international community”. In a similar vein if a country, in a deliberate policy, calls for “Death to America” or “Death to Israel” you take them at their word and take steps to eliminate the threat. Iran, of course, comes to mind. You do not hold talks with these countries, try to bargain with them or wait for them to attack you before responding. You take pre-emptive action.

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  • BigB 10/18/2009 at 10:40

    But far from inducing more liberal behavior on the part of Turkey, those supposedly enlightened reforms have paved the way for the Islamist ascendance in the country.
    Are you absolutely sure they did not know that?
    why is it the Raad Sallah is allowed the run of the country to incite his co-religionists to intifadah?
    Why is it that rabble-rousers such as Ahmad Tibi and Zehalka are allowed to ply their rabid antisemitism via the Knesset?
    Because those in power (not the Media) know the truth. The truth is that co-habitation with Islam is well-nigh impossible. Brussels did not want to accept 80 million Muslim Turks into Europe so a de-facto invasion and occupation is achieved without a shot fired. Israel does not really want the Arabs to settle in deeply and proliferate. The Knesset knows that only open incitement by muslims inebriated by the seeming weakness of the Jewish enemy can present the Truth to the people so that one day, when the opportunity presents, they can be repatriated to their homeland.
    Turkey breaking away from the Western Alliance creates the opportunity for Europe to repatriate the Turks. Open intifadah and war within Israel will precipitate the total expulsion of Arabs east of the Jordan, as foreseen by Churchill.

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  • Gruff Guru 10/19/2009 at 11:13

    I read the translation of the article in a turkish newspaper. As a Turk who does not like the current governement, I have to admit that the article represents the other extreme of the crticised fact. Regarding the positiom of Caroline, one has to distinguish the colors between black and white. In any political position there is a methodology of defending an idea. Right with the first sentence we can easily guess how the rest will come out. One should remember that no alliance has ever changed in one night. If one studies the history of middle-east, of course not starting from 1948, the area represent the entanglement of many influneces of several civilisations and people. To define the area in terms of political axis is rather a blindness for truth. The article seems to be an extension of colr blind neo-con discourse, which is already a “lame duck”.
    The comments made for the article seems to be written with full of anger and bias, merely serves to inbreed ideas and emotion to get some public support and eventually fanaticism.

    Reply
  • CharlesMartel 10/19/2009 at 13:02

    Dear Ms. Glick,
    Rather than being a direct comment addressing the regrettable (to say the least!) situation regarding Turkey discussed above, I just wanted to state that I just viewed your recent video on PJTV.
    Allow me to say how impressed I was with your commentary and how valuable the information you provided.
    And now this comment as a result.
    Moreover, I found your biographical information to be most extremely impressive.
    I am confident that in you, I have found another source of the truth: The US media not being in the truth business as you have noticed.
    I am a US citizen, Protestant, and I live in Tokyo. I am a long way from home in Virginia, but with the internet I find I am more knowledgeable than ever about my country and world events. I am quite “plugged in.”
    I read widely and that includes both history, military history (basically that is history), and philosophy (I would like to emulate Socrates and Epictetus, but hard acts to follow).
    Now to the point: I am now seeing more clearly than ever before the big picture and I am seeing the truth of it.
    That is, the continued encroachment of (Radical) Islam around the globe and the West`s tolerance of this dangerous tide in the name of diversity is the most sinister threat we face today.
    Toleration of (Radical) Islam leads of course to a decrease in toleration in direct relationship to the range of toleration that allowed it to flourish begin with. Most ironic, and again, dangerous.Islam is not tolerant. More Islam, less diversity, less freedom. Very clear pattern here.
    The tide must be turned back. It has been turned back again and again and again and note I include the Greek struggle with Persia in this equation despite the birth of Islam at much later date.
    Islam is ever the aggressor. Nothing has changed.
    My MA degree is in Asian Studies and I can also tell you that China is unfortunately back on track assuming again its arrogant role as the “Middle Kingdom”(中国).
    Mankind has not changed so much nor have the basic national characters of the countries whose origins are ancient and largely homogeneous.
    And many of these have and continue to be aggressor nations.
    I deplore the anti-Semitism I see displayed so freely around the world. I was raised to respect religious freedom. Taught to consider Islam one of the Great Religions at university, but I am finding this increasingly difficult to justify in light of Islam`s history and present aggression.
    Christianity long ago put such horrors behind it. Islam actively encourages them even now.
    Yes. Realism is the key.
    In the real world we have evil and it cannot be appeased. Appeasement always leads to more carnage, not less.
    In a utopia, we could afford the (il)liberal viewpoint, perhaps.
    But there is no utopia.
    Waterboarding is not torture. Not that I mind torture of those who would without remorse slice the head from an innocent whose is targeted for nothing more than having a Bible in his hand. I refer to the Korean man slaughtered on video.He is only one of many victims as we are all aware.
    Having one`s head sliced off IS torture.Are liberals so obtuse as to compare waterboarding to beheading and find them equal? It appears they are that obtuse.
    I forced myself to watch several beheadings and I can assure I did not do this for thrills. Unlike you I have no military experience, yet I need to know my enemy. And I learned about my enemy. I was sickened by what I saw and it haunts me to this day as it should.
    A liberal about to get his head sliced off gurgling out his last pleas for life is surely made aware of his confusion between utopia and the real.
    Before his head is removed, I doubt he would mind the waterboarding of someone who could provide information as to his location to armed and dangerous rescuers. Special forces, the liberal would hope for.Green Beret. Navy Seals.
    The Seventh Cavalry under Custer. One brave man with a an old shotgun even.
    The diverse liberal rescued and then we have the intstant transformation of the liberal to the hard realist.He will no longer vote democrat.
    My apologies for my meanders and digressions, but I have a plentiful source of righteous anger
    in me for these terrorists. Or my countrymen who would weaken the US from without and within.
    Obama`s policies are a disaster on both the domestic and foreign fronts and for this I do say he quite deserved his Peace Prize from a world wishing for a feeble America.
    Of course once America is truly feeble and enervated, the world will wish again for someone to help it, but that light will no longer be bright enough to to burn away the shadows.
    I support Israel and Israel is on the side of good. Good enough for me. No country is perfect. But some are to be MUCH preferred to others. A functioning democracy is always a good sign of a good country.
    Israel is an oasis of the West surrounded by a desert of aggressors. This is crystal clear.
    I firmly believe there can be no peace with the evil surrounding Israel. It is not possible and proven repeatedly to not be possible.
    I only wonder why Israel has not already taken measures against Iranian nuclear installation(s).
    It appears we may not. Oh, yes, quite deserving of the Peace Prize, indeed.
    The Pentagon appears to have ordered a couple of enhanced MOABs.
    I hope they are put to use quickly for the sake of SAVING lives.
    Obama will no doubt find a place in history as a textbook case as to what an American president should not be.
    I am truly praying the American people vote as many liberals as possible out of Congress in 2010 and 2012.
    Tempus Fugit but not fast enough for me.
    Much danger could be hiding in the next three years . . . .
    Now, I am going to investigate your book.
    Thank you for the truth.
    If you see Michael Yon, thank him for me as well. Same goes for VDH and Jonah Goldberg.
    Sincerely yours,
    CharlesMartel
    (American in Tokyo)

    Reply
  • CharlesMartel 10/19/2009 at 23:59

    “The comments made for the article seems to be written with full of anger and bias, merely serves to inbreed ideas and emotion to get some public support and eventually fanaticism.
    Posted by Gruff Guru | October 19, 2009 11:13 AM”
    The above excerpt is indeed meant to be provocative. And perhaps not worthy of response.But allow me to take the bait for I am in need of a snack.
    As to my comment, I can assure you it was written with anger. It was written with the anger of a thoughtful person who does not like the realistic and logical conclusion that Islam functions as an oppressive force and intolerant threat to those who value liberty and freedom above all things.
    According to liberals and those who clothe themselves in liberal suits when it suits their purposes, anger is always a bad thing. Actually that notion is so much illiberal new age psycho-babble. Anger has its proper place along with other human emotions.
    To NOT be angry at the evil represented by an intolerant Islam is rather the problem.To NOT be angry at terrorism is rather the indication of extreme confusion on the part of the thinking person.
    As to bias, I admit I am biased against evil.
    Terrorism and the State-sanctioned support of terrorists are quite worthy of bias.
    In fact, it is demonstrable on a daily basis that the true unjustifiable bias belongs to those who number among the terrorists, those who harbor them, those who fund them, and even those whose passivity allows the above to operate freely.
    If my comment represents bias, you can be assured such bias (and anger) have been well-earned by the heinous terrorists and those who aid them or even suffer their presence.
    This is not truth to power.
    This is power to truth.
    As to fanatacism, I leave that to the terrorists and their ilk.
    I am no fanatic.
    Rather a thinking person whose anger grows at injustice.
    Normally, I am peaceful man. But it is just such a meeting of the minds of otherwise peaceful people angered by true evil that such true evil must eventually fear.
    If terrorists would merely confine their activities to their own nations within their own borders, I would have no problem with that.
    But when evil reaches out for me with no justification whatsoever, I find myself quite angry indeed.
    And with no qualms.

    Reply
  • rloader 11/18/2009 at 23:54

    It is with such sadness I see the destruction of the human race with the appeasement of Islam. The Socialist (read Communist) Governments we now have in Britain, Australia and America in particular are actually encouraging the breakdown of normal life in Western Society. They have got in positions of power in Government, the Law Courts, Local Government Councils, all sorts of Committees Financial Institution, the UN. They are so deluded they think they can use the Muslims to so weaken western society that they can then come in and take over. Their aim is for a New World Order or World Government. Millions of Russians and Chinese were killed by their own Governments to achieve this aim. However, it is very clearly set out in the Bible (Ezekiel I think) that whichever nations attack Israel will be wiped out – otherwise I would have no hope for this present world. It could be such a beautiful world if the money used for weapons and treachery was directed towards making the world a better place. There should be no poor, disadvantaged people.

    Reply
  • hunn 05/31/2010 at 19:58

    I am also a Harvard Kennedy school graduate and this similarity was one of the main reasons that pushed me to read this blog instead of many others. However, i have changed upon facing with too factual mistakes in this article.
    I will not mention them one by one but highlight two main points:
    – Although Israelis feel relaxed in believing that, breaking of ties with Israel does not mean breaking of ties with West for Turkey.
    – It is impossible to claim that Tayyip Erdogan did not had a key role in the deterioration of Turkish-Israeli relations. However, to those believe that the ties will strengthen if Erdogan loses the government, I would suggest just to read the speeches of opposing parties in Turkey, CHP and MHP, just after the one minute show of Erdogan in Davos. Everything aside, Erdogan used to be blamed by the opposition in Turkey as being pro Jewish and America as recent as 2 years ago.
    The unpleasant fact is that the strong ties between two countries was mainly the result of the cold war. And now Turkey simply does not feel a threat from her neighbors (esp. Russia) to engage in a partnership with Israel at the expense of her relations with Arabs.

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  • guest 10/27/2010 at 10:06

    The Western world cannot afford to “lose” Turkey and coming to terms with Turkey’s Islamisation means coming to terms with its own Islamisation. Whatever idiocies have been committed by Bush, Obama and EU so far, they need to be overturned and corrected simply because there is no other solution. Unless of course a war against the united forces of Turkey and Iran is taken into stride (by NATO?). It should also be noted that even the author of this article makes the mistake of calling Turkey a secular Islamic state, ignoring the fact that a state cannot be both secular and Islamic, which would be a contradiction in terms.

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